Question:

Why does bottled water have an expiration date?

by Guest4100  |  12 years, 9 month(s) ago

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Why does bottled water have an expiration date?

 Tags: bottled, date, expiration, Water

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8 ANSWERS

  1. Guest8896
    Because the plastic may go funny, it's not the water that will go out of date but if you leave water in the bottle until the expiry date and don't open it the water will go stagnate because it's been in there so long. If you drink the water and reuse the bottle and the use by date is something like christmas day just buy a new one before that and continue doing the same thing.

  2. Guest4496
    i was just thinking the same thing

    i cant remember why

    but my science teacher told me
  3. Guest3057
    THAT IS A GOOD QUESTION
  4. Guest9148
    There is a chance that over time (years), the container could cause the water to have a different taste. There is much more information at the website in the Links section.

    There are two main types of sterilization that all food and drink manufacturers use. The first is the use of peracetic acid that gives an instant kill to most pathogens (bugs that make you ill). The second is the use of steam. Holding a steam temperature of above 120 degrees in the product line for 15 minutes will kill virtually all pathogens. However, some bacteria form spores which are virtually indestructible and can last for millions of years. The only way to make totally sterile drinks would be to irradiate them, which wouldn't make them radioactive, but would make them cost a great deal of money to produce. Thus, the manufacturer cannot guarantee that their product is free of pathogens and gives it a 'use by' to minimize their liability. Packaging deterioration is the other reason for the "Best By" Date.

    Please do not make the mistake of thinking that "Bottled Water" means pure, sterile, perfect water. It may surprise you to know that there is very little regulation concerning 'bottled water'. For example, it is common practise to label the bottle with such things as " Spring Water" or "Mountain fresh" while the water is actually taken directly from municipal sources! Look for yourself at the fine print and see.
  5. Guest7064
    I believe it's because the law states that all food and beverages have to have an expiration date. The water doesn't actually go bad, though after a very long time it might absorb some chemicals out of or through the plastic of the bottle.
  6. Guest2244
    Only on Mars
  7. Guest7768
    There are two main types of sterilization that all food and drink manufacturers use. The first is the use of peracetic acid that gives an instant kill to most pathogens (bugs that make you ill). The second is the use of steam. Holding a steam temperature of above 120 degrees in the product line for 15 minutes will kill virtually all pathogens. However, some bacteria form spores which are virtually indestructible and can last for millions of years. The only way to make totally sterile drinks would be to irradiate them, which wouldn't make them radioactive, but would make them cost a great deal of money to produce. Thus, the manufacturer cannot guarantee that their product is free of pathogens and gives it a 'use by' to minimize their liability. Packaging deterioration is the other reason for the "Best By" Date.

    So, water needs an "expiration"
  8. Brett
    There is a chance that over time (years), the container could cause the water to have a different taste. There is much more information at the website in the Links section.

    There are two main types of sterilization that all food and drink manufacturers use. The first is the use of peracetic acid that gives an instant kill to most pathogens (bugs that make you ill). The second is the use of steam. Holding a steam temperature of above 120 degrees in the product line for 15 minutes will kill virtually all pathogens. However, some bacteria form spores which are virtually indestructible and can last for millions of years. The only way to make totally sterile drinks would be to irradiate them, which wouldn't make them radioactive, but would make them cost a great deal of money to produce. Thus, the manufacturer cannot guarantee that their product is free of pathogens and gives it a 'use by' to minimize their liability. Packaging deterioration is the other reason for the "Best By" Date.
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